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Early sighting
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brianh



Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 3:25 pm    Post subject: Early sighting Reply with quote

I report that today I saw my first hoverfly of the year. It was a male Eristalis tenax sunning on a wall. No doubt others may have already spotted other hoverflies, and I know that in other years they have been seen as early as January 1st. Nevertheless I hope that this is a sign that we are in for a good year of recording.
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John O'Sullivan



Joined: 05 Oct 2005
Posts: 128
Location: Sandy, Bedfordshire, UK

PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Snow falling again here, Brian, so locals might be a while in joining the 2010 club!
Perhaps of interest: two weeks in the field in Morocco in January (after other things) produced not a single hoverfly.
Regards,
John
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Tony White



Joined: 12 Mar 2006
Posts: 61
Location: Byfield, Northants

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not a sausage yet here in west Northants. This time last year I was watching early insect visitors to my snowdrops and there were bumble bees on the wing but - sensibly - they're still tucked up somewhere dry.
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Peter Follett



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Dorking

PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2010 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nothing about here in Surrey so far this year. Snow showers still continuing but Hazel starting to blossom, first sign of Spring?
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Roger K.A. Morris



Joined: 06 Nov 2005
Posts: 1652

PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Brian

It would be useful to have a log of such records - keeping a spreadsheet of such observations would be really useful for the scheme.

Happy hunting

Roger
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brianh



Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 150

PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has taken a long time for my second sighting. This time a female Eristalis tenax which I captured and then released. It was sunning itself on gravel in my garden. Presumably to warm up enough to fly. The sun is out again after what seems several weeks and is quite warm, but I still have ice on the garden pond.
This record will be added to my annual spreadsheet.
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Tony White



Joined: 12 Mar 2006
Posts: 61
Location: Byfield, Northants

PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At last - hoverflies (Eristalis tenax) visiting the Crocus species in the garden. I attempted to take one but missed. Instead I found that I had taken a specimen of Lonchoptera lutea. Ok, it isn't a hoverfly but a surprising fly to take this early in the year.
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pierre mille



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 67
Location: Conflans Ste Honorine in France (Val d'Oise)

PostPosted: Sun Mar 07, 2010 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

It's the Family Lonchoptérides it's that ?

if a male in this case the anal vein appears to terminate on the edge of the wing as she joins the ulnar in the female.

I'm new to this forum and I am interested in hoverflies. I watched salix caprea but the kitten is not yet out and saw an apple orchard but are still far from blooming. I have a question for you.

Is that the genus Microdon has a plumule ?

Best wishes

_________________
PIERRE
http://cyrille.dussaix.pagesperso-orange.fr
http://www.diptera.info
http://www.atlashymenoptera.net
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John O'Sullivan



Joined: 05 Oct 2005
Posts: 128
Location: Sandy, Bedfordshire, UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vive la difference, Pierre, but we might need some extra languages to help us out here!

As to Tony's fly, we are certainly talking about the Lonchopteridae (from the Greek meaning "spear-winged", I gather): thanks for the information about the wing veins.

The flowers of Salix caprea (and other shrubs, including Corylus avellana) are called "catkins" in English. Apparently, it's from a Dutch word, meaning, er, "kitten", which is what English speakers call a young cat.

Are you still with me? When you say "plumule" do you mean a structure on the antenna? If so, could it be the arista (which is certainly unusual in Microdon, being basal)? Or perhaps you could be thinking of an arrangement as in Volucella bombylans, which has what we call a "plumose" antenna in English.

John
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pierre mille



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 67
Location: Conflans Ste Honorine in France (Val d'Oise)

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2010 12:08 pm    Post subject: plumule Reply with quote

Hi John,

Thank you for your kindness, the English are reputed to be friendly and it's true Laughing ! In fact I was not referring to the arista but the plumule is
second useful characteristic, it resembles a velvety feather, located on the side of the chest, beneath the base of the wing. The curious chemoreceptor trigger small structure is not well studied, but almost exclusively to Hoverfly. In your opinion is this valid? Does not some hoverflies plumule this ?

I wondered if the genus microdon exception to this rule ?

Best wishes

_________________
PIERRE
http://cyrille.dussaix.pagesperso-orange.fr
http://www.diptera.info
http://www.atlashymenoptera.net
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John O'Sullivan



Joined: 05 Oct 2005
Posts: 128
Location: Sandy, Bedfordshire, UK

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Pierre,

Well, this is all new to me. Perhaps those with ready access to specimens of Microdon (unlike me) will be able to comment on the presence/absence of the plumule. Others again may know more about how unique it is to hoverflies. However, I rather suspect that you may be ahead of most readers of this Forum on suchlike matters!

John
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pierre mille



Joined: 14 Feb 2010
Posts: 67
Location: Conflans Ste Honorine in France (Val d'Oise)

PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:28 pm    Post subject: plumule Reply with quote

Hi John,

But I assure you I am a beginner in Syrphidae, I began to seriously study from January 2009. I read a lot and I documented a lot, I go to the field because I love it. When I say seriously is to say that I am doing systematic Syrphidae, I study the binocular my specimens. So far as the book I Verlinden (1994) as it is in French. But I subscribed to the magazine Volucella I advise you and here is a

http://www.naturkundemuseum-bw.de/stuttgart/volucella/?p=ueber&LANG=EN

I'll subscribe to the newsletter Hoverfly this forum but I expect a little money because it's like snow melting in the sun:)

I am also interested in bees and wasps are solitary insects exciting:)

Best wishes

_________________
PIERRE
http://cyrille.dussaix.pagesperso-orange.fr
http://www.diptera.info
http://www.atlashymenoptera.net
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Peter Follett



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 18
Location: Dorking

PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all,
Hovers appearing at last, E balteatus, E tenax and C albipila in good numbers on Sallow blossom and settled on dead herbage in sunshine. Sallows just coming out here in Surrey, but even very small bushes can produce good species and numbers.
Hoping for a good year, regards.
Peter Follett
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Sandy



Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Posts: 135
Location: East Lothian

PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great news Peter! Spring in Surrey at last. Now assuming spring travels north at around 8 miles/day and distance from Surrey to East Lothian is around 250 miles I should start seeing hovers around.........MAY!! Sad
Oh...No!!
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Ian Andrews



Joined: 08 Aug 2007
Posts: 180
Location: Pocklington, East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sandy

Reasons to be cheerful #1

Distance from East Riding of Yorkshire to you is less, though, so move that forward to mid-April! Very Happy Just got back from local heath with a bunch of stuff to identify, at least 7 different species. Bearing in mind I was only out for a couple of hours...through much of which it drizzled...and that there were only two approachable sallows in flower...not so bad.
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