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Criorhina ranunculi

 
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NickU



Joined: 21 Apr 2010
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 5:29 pm    Post subject: Criorhina ranunculi Reply with quote

I photographed a wonderful red-tailed bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) mimic in Wiltshire today and thought it might have been Merodon equestris, but it has been identified as Criorhina ranunculi by Dr. Martin Hauser on the Diptera.info site http://www.diptera.info/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id=7&thread_id=29440&pid=130993#post_130993

Checking your site, it seems like this species is scarce (or at least rarely recorded in the UK, 40 record sites since 1960) so I thought it might be of interest to the HRS.

Photo taken near Box, Wiltshire, southwest UK 21.4.10

I would attach the photos, but it seems direct uploads are not possible on this site and I hope that the above weblink is useful.

Nick Upton - naturalist and photographer
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conopid



Joined: 03 Sep 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Shrewsbury, Shropshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the record. C ranunculi is widespread but could not be described as common. It's always a treat to see them. They appear to be present around most old woodlands.
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Nigel Jones
Shrewsbury
Shropshire
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NickU



Joined: 21 Apr 2010
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK thanks Nigel. The info on this site for this species may need to be updated as what you say suggests it is less scarce than is suggested. Maybe it's a species on the increase, or more people are taking digital pics and noticing them. No truly ancient woodland near the site (my garden), but it's a rural area with some quite mature woodland a few hundred meters away. Will post another supposedly old woodland species I saw on Ivy flowers in the garden last year, Didea fasciata, which also seems to be seen more often than in the past.
Nick
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conopid



Joined: 03 Sep 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Shrewsbury, Shropshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Nick,
Since Falk & Stubbs was published in 1983, then 2002 (and much of the text on this site is lifted from that publication I think) many species that were considered as formerly scarce, have now been discovered to be much commoner than we thought. This is due to greater recorder effort, particularly the work of photographers like yourself. So keep up the great work!

Didea fasciata is certainly one of those species that has proved to be much more widespread than was originally postulated. It turns up in all areas regularly and is certainly not confined to old woodlands. I get specimens in my town garden most years.

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Nigel Jones
Shrewsbury
Shropshire
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conopid



Joined: 03 Sep 2005
Posts: 342
Location: Shrewsbury, Shropshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Nick,
Since Falk & Stubbs was published in 1983, then 2002 (and much of the text on this site is lifted from that publication I think) many species that were considered as formerly scarce, have now been discovered to be much commoner than we thought. This is due to greater recorder effort, particularly the work of photographers like yourself. So keep up the great work!

Didea fasciata is certainly one of those species that has proved to be much more widespread than was originally postulated. It turns up in all areas regularly and is certainly not confined to old woodlands. I get specimens in my town garden most years. None-the-less it is not an abundant species by any means.

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Nigel Jones
Shrewsbury
Shropshire
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NickU



Joined: 21 Apr 2010
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again Nigel for the extra info. Much as I'd guessed. I think I saw one today, bit it didn't hang around for me to be sure. Definitely saw a Criorhina again.. Good to know us happy snappers are helping add some useful records!
Nick
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