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Anasimyia interpuncta

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Anasimyia interpuncta Reply with quote

Anasimyia interpuncta (Harris, [1776])

Identification ease/difficulty: 4

StatusSources of information
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:40 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Anasimyia interpuncta (Harris, 1776)

Biology: Larvae of this genus are of the ‘long-tailed’ type, but this species is not yet described. Adults are found in fens and river margins where decaying vegetation, especially Glyceria, is abundant, although the species has been recorded at localities dominated by Phragmites. They have been found at Woodwalton and Wicken Fens around paths adjacent to areas flooded in winter where they will visit flowers, especially Caltha

Distribution: A scarce species with a limited distribution in the fens of East Anglia, the Norfolk Broads, the Thames Marshes and the marshes of East Sussex. It is mainly an early flying species, so it is perhaps overlooked, but recent records from the Norfolk Broads show that there is at least a partial second generation in July/August
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stuart
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

[i]Anasimyia interpuncta[i] (Harris, 1776) (no longer regarded as synonymous with A. transfuga). VULNERABLE

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 96, 97 and 191, pl. 12:8.

Distribution: Greater London, and in the fens and marshes of East Anglia and the East Midlands. A total of four sites.

Habitat and ecology: The larvae are of the rat-tailed maggot type, living an aquatic existence (details are unknown). The margins of ditches and ponds provide breeding sites.

Status: A very little-known species. Its London site has been destroyed (by industrial infilling). It occurs on Wicken Fen and has been recorded from Woodwalton Fen, but it is scarce and its management requirements are not known. In Norfolk it has been taken on one site which is grazing marsh.Conservation: Woodwalton Fen is an NNR, and Wicken Fen is a property of the National Trust.

Author: A.E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

ANASIMYIA INTERPUNCTA (Harris) RARE

DISTRIBUTION Scattered records in southeast England from Hampshire to Norfolk, most frequent in the Thames estuary and the Nene/Ouse washes of the fens.

HABITAT Known equally from coastal and inland marshes. Associated with tall emergent vegetation such as Glyceria maxima at margins of standing water and there is some indication that nutrient-rich winter flooded sites are preferred. Some of the Essex sites are slightly stagnant in places.

ECOLOGY Larvae aquatic, possibly developing in the sheaths of partly submerged water plants such as G. maxima. Adults recorded from May to July.

STATUS Only separated from the very local A. lunulata in recent years, since when it has shown itself to be the more restricted of the two with an entirely different habitat requirement and about a dozen known post 1960 sites. Status revised from RDB2 (Shirt 1987).

THREAT The drainage of wetlands for agricultural reclamation or afforestation. A fall in the water level can lead to a loss of pools, ditches and their marginal vegetation and subsequent scrub invasion. Complete or extensive clearance of marginal vegetation from water edges (e.g. canal restoration, pond management, ditch clearance). Pollution such as agricultural run-off or that from industry or sewage, especially at sites in the Thames estuary, could be a problem although it clearly seems to tolerate sites of high fertility.

MANAGEMENT Maintain a high, stable water level with pools, ditches and a rich marginal vegetation. Use rotational ditch management if necessary.
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