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Chamaesyrphus caledonicus

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Chamaesyrphus caledonicus Reply with quote

Chamaesyrphus caledonicus Collin, 1940

Identification ease/difficulty: 5

StatusSources of information
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stuart
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:40 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Chamaesyrphus caledonicus Collin, 1940

Biology: The larvae of this species remain undescribed. Adults have been found by sweeping heathy vegetation under Pinus, including dunes planted with pines, in central Scotland

Distribution: This little known and extremely rare hoverfly was discovered in Britain by Dr.D.Sharp at “Boat-o-Garten” in July 1903, but was identified as C. lusitanicus, a species known otherwise only from Spain and Portugal. In August 1935, C.J.Wainwright and J.E.Collin caught “a few specimens at Culbin Sandhills” and Collin was able to compare them with cotypes of C. lusitanicus, concluding that they belonged to a new species which he described as C. caledonicus (Collin, 1940). Recently, it has been taken by I. Perry in Rothiemurchus in July 1988 and again at Culbin Sands (under Pinus growing on the dunes) by A. Wass in July 1991. The only other record available is a specimen in the British Museum collection taken in July 1917 by J.J.F.X.King from “Rannoch”.
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stuart
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Chamaesyrphus caledonicus Collin, 1940 ENDANGERED

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 102 and 204, pl. 5:20.

Distribution: Moray (Grampian).

Habitat and ecology: Unknown.

Status: One female was taken in August 1938 at Culbin Sands, a locality now largely covered in conifer plantations. This is the only reliable specimen (M. C. D. Speight, pers. comm.) though a very few other specimens from the Scottish Highlands have been attributed to this species. If these other specimens are in future regarded as a different species, such a species will itself be a Red Data Book candidate.

Author: A. E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

CHAMAESYPHUS CALEDONICUS Collin ENDANGERED

DISTRIBUTION The only certain locality (according to Speight, pre 1988) is Culbin Sandhills in Scotland, where it was taken in August 1935. Further material regarded as belonging to this species by Coe came from the Central Highlands, though some of his material is now known to be misidentified. A very recent record from Rothiemurchus Forest, Easterness (1988) is said to genuinely represent this species.

HABITAT Heathland associated with Caledonian pine forest.

ECOLOGY Biology unknown. A development within dead wood or damp soil are 2 more obvious possibilities.

STATUS No recent information from Culbin Sands despite further visits to the site. Its status in the mid Spey will need closer examination.

THREAT Destruction or modification of the known site especially through afforestation.

MANAGEMENT Attempt to maintain stability of the known site, in particular by retaining any dead wood and boggy areas which may provide potential breeding sites.
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