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Rhingia rostrata

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Rhingia rostrata Reply with quote

Rhingia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Identification ease/difficulty: 3

StatusHabitat indicator statusSources of information
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:41 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Rhingia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Biology: Larvae unknown. Many records are associated with deciduous woodland and Speight (1998) states that adults fly “within woodland, visiting flowers in small glades and dappled sunlight”. Like, R. campestris, it has two flight periods in May/June and again in early Autumn, but Autumn records are much more numerous

Distribution: A rare and enigmatic species which is sometimes found in great abundance at a locality and then disappears. Records are concentrated in south-east England, especially in the woods of the Weald and the Chilterns, and in South Wales. Records from the latter area have increased, especially in the autumn
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stuart
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Rhingia rostrata (L., 1758) VULNERABLE

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 88 and 178, pl. 5:5.

Distribution: Scattered records for southern England, also north-west Wales.

Habitat and ecology: Woodland. The larval habitat is unknown; R. campestrisfeeds in cattle dung so R. rostratacould use dung or perhaps carrion.

Status: Recorded very infrequently but it can suddently appear in numbers at a site for a few weeks and then vanish. No permanent populations are known. It was last reported in Britain in 1976.

Author: A. E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:09 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

RHINGIA ROSTRATA (Linnaeus) NOTABLE

DISTRIBUTION Records widely dispersed in southern England extending as far north as Worcestershire and also in Wales (Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire, Cardiganshire, Denbighshire).

HABITAT An association with ancient broadleaved woodlands is apparent (shaded conditions could be required).

ECOLOGY Larval biology unknown and circumstantial evidence suggests it is unlikely to be cow dung like the common C. campestris though some other form of decaying organic matter such as carrion is a possibility. Adults recorded from May to September probably as two broods. They feed on a range of tubular flowers including bluebell, alkanet Pentaglottis sempervirens and ragged robin Lychnis flos-cuculi and seem to prefer red and purple flowers, though they are occasionally reported visiting spring flowering shrubs.

STATUS Infrequent and very erratic, it may suddenly appear in abundance and then will not be seen for many years. About 25 post 1960 sites are known and are scattered widely. It was particularly frequent in Kent in the 1960s with some eight sites but has since declined. A number of the more recent records are from Wales, where it may be under-recorded. Status revised from RDB2 (Shirt 1987).

THREAT Clearance of woodland for agriculture and intensive forestry. Mis-management of heath and woodland rides and clearings, with resultant scrub and bracken invasion.

MANAGEMENT Maintain open rides and clearings in woods, with flowers for adult feeding.
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