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Brachyopa bicolor

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Brachyopa bicolor Reply with quote

Brachyopa bicolor (FallÚn, 1817)

Identification ease/difficulty: 4

StatusHabitat indicator statusSources of information
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:40 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Brachyopa bicolor (FallÚn, 1817)

Biology: The larvae occur in runs or other accumulations of sap, usually under the bark of *, but also Aesculus and Quercus. Adults are usually found sitting on sun-lit tree trunks or vegetation near the larval habitat, and have also been taken at burrows of the goat moth, Cossus cossus (Perry quoted in Stubbs, 1996). Males will hover close to sap-runs. Does not seem to visit flowers

Distribution: A rare southern species which has been found most frequently in the New Forest and the Windsor area. Old records require caution, as this was the only member of its genus recognised as British prior to 1939, and the additional species were not covered by a widely available key until that by Coe (1953). Consequently, older records could refer to any Brachyopa species, unless a specimen still exists and can be checked
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stuart
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Brachyopa bicolor (Fallen, 1817) VULNERABLE

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 89 and 180.

Distribution: The New Forest and Windsor Forest; also Hertfordshire and Sussex.

Habitat and ecology: Dead wood (or possibly sap runs), associated with large standing live trees, especially beech*.

Status: The only known regular site is in the New Forest. It is certainly very rare in Windsor Forest/Great Park. The other records are old.

Author: A. E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:09 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

BRACHYOPA BICOLOR (Fallen) RARE

DISTRIBUTION Records widely scattered in Southern England (Wiltshire, Hampshire, Sussex, Hertfordshire, Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Staffordshire) also Breconshire in Wales, with most records for the New Forest and Windsor Forest.

HABITAT Ancient broadleaved woodland. Closely associated with beech, requiring old diseased trees.

ECOLOGY The larvae probably develop under the dead bark of beech, favouring old diseased trees. Adults visit spring blossom such as that of cherry and hawthorn and are recorded from early May to mid June.

STATUS A very local and possibly declining species with about 10 known post 1960 sites, six within the New Forest (Mark Ash, Ober Water, Queens Bower, Bolderford Bridge, Millyford Bridge Heath, Bramshaw) and additional sites in Wiltshire (Chickengrove Bottom, late 1960s), Berkshire (Windsor Forest, not a strong population with relatively few records in relation to recording effort), Herefordshire (Cusop Dingle - 1977) and Breconshire (Ystradfellte - 1964). Status revised from RDB2 (Shirt 1987).

THREAT Clearance of old broadleaved woodland and old beech trees for agriculture or intensive forestry. The shading out of rides and clearings within woods.

MANAGEMENT Retain any old diseased beech trees especially those with obvious sap runs or diseased limbs. A continuity of old diseased trees with suitable sap runs is crucial and requires large areas of woodland to ensure reasonably stable levels of the breeding resource. Maintain rides and clearings with spring blossom for adult feeding.
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