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Callicera aurata

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Callicera aurata Reply with quote

Callicera aurata (Rossi, 1790)

NomenclatureIdentification ease/difficulty: 2

StatusHabitat indicator statusSources of information
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:40 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Callicera aurata (Rossi, 1790) Callicera aenea (Fabricius, 1777) in Coe (1953), Kloet & Hincks (1976) and Stubbs & Falk (1983) see Speight (1991)

Biology: The larvae usually inhabit water-filled rot holes in *, although other tree species can be used; there is, for example, a recent record from a rot hole in Betula. This species may frequent trees in urban situations, as well as in woodland. Recent experiments in the New Forest have shown that artificial ‘hoverfly nest-boxes’ (plastic bottles containing water and sawdust with a side opening) are successful in supporting larvae. Adults are elusive, and may be mainly arboreal, but can be found visiting Crataegus flowers. They have also been recorded at Rosa canina, Rubus, Cotoneaster, Prunus lusitanica, and white umbels

Distribution: A rare species occurring mainly in southern forests. The majority of records come from the New Forest, although there are scattered records north to the Lake District. Like other members of the genus, the adults of this species are very difficult to find, and it is probably easier to record by searching for larvae
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Callicera aenea (F., 1777) VULNERABLE

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 73 and 159, pl. 9:2.

Distribution: Scattered records, mainly in southern England but extending northwards to Yorkshire. For map see Entwistle & Stubbs (1983), map 3.

Habitat and ecology: Unknown. The larvae almost certainly live in dead wood (an adult has been seen about birch logs). There is no obvious habitat association, perhaps open structured woods being the most plausible.

Status: Unpredictable in occurrence and seemingly extremely rare.

Author: A. E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:09 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

CALLICERA AENEA (Fabricius) RARE

DISTRIBUTION Mainly recorded from southern England, with scattered old records as far north as Yorkshire and a recent one from Carmarthenshire (1986).

HABITAT Preferences rather unclear; there seems to be some bias towards heathland, though many records apply to old broadleaved woodland. In 1988, it was remarkably recorded from a garden in Wolverhampton. Old trees are probably a requirement.

ECOLOGY The larvae probably develop in water filled cavities and pot holes of broadleaved trees. An adult has been seen about birch logs on a common in north Hampshire, and a preference for dead or old birch on commons and heaths seems feasible. Adults recorded from June to August.

STATUS Infrequent and perhaps declining with about 15 known post 1960 sites. Records are very unpredictable and there seems to be very little attachment to individual sites, suggesting a species with a mobile and adventive nature. Status revised from RDB2 (Shirt 1987).

THREAT Removal of dead wood and post mature trees.

MANAGEMENT Retain any old trees and dead wood and ensure a continuity of these in the future.
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