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Sphaerophoria loewi

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Sphaerophoria loewi Reply with quote

Sphaerophoria loewi Zetterstedt, 1843

Identification ease/difficulty: 4

StatusSources of information
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stuart
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:41 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Sphaerophoria loewi Zetterstedt, 1843

Biology: Larvae unknown. Adults have been found in brackish reed-beds (usually Phragmites, but also Scirpus maritimus at Leighton Moss) at a few coastal localities. It is likely that the larvae feed on aphids or other soft-bodied Homoptera in this habitat. It has been suggested that the adult is active very early in the morning, but there are several recent records made in the middle of the day. Adults fly amongst stands of tall vegetation, usually remaining over the water, but they occasionally visit flowers

Distribution: A very rare species known only from a few widely separated coastal localities. The common feature in these localities seems to be the presence of brackish marsh. There is one inland record, of an adult swept from Phragmites on a marshy loch side near Aviemore in central Scotland. Normally found as isolated single specimens, it is, however, reported to be reasonably frequent at Leighton Moss and the Tay Reedbeds
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stuart
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Sphaerophoria loewi Sphaerophoria lowei Zetterstedt, 1843.

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 70 and 153, pl. A:17,18.

Distribution: Scattered coastal localities in southern counties and also north Lancashire. One inland locality in the Scottish Highlands.

Habitat and ecology: Mainly a species of brackish marsh, usually in association with sea club-rush Scirpus maritimusor reed Phragmites.The larvae will be of the aphid-feeding type.

Status: Very rare and in very few localities.

Author: A. E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:09 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

SPHAEROPHORIA LOEWI Zetterstedt VULNERABLE

DISTRIBUTION Relatively few records scattered widely in England and Scotland (Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex, Kent, Essex, Lincolnshire, Lancashire, Easterness).

HABITAT Wetlands, especially brackish coastal marshes with stands of Scirpus maritimus or Phragmites, although it is known from an inland site on Phragmites. Abroad it is associated with coastal dune lakes and brackish lagoons.

ECOLOGY Larvae probably aphidophagous. Adults recorded from July to September.

STATUS Infrequent with only four recent records: Pett Levels, Sussex (1987); Fairfield Pit, Lincolnshire (1987); Leighton Moss, Lancashire (1960) and Kinrara, Easterness (1982).

THREAT The drainage of brackish coastal marshes for coastal development, agricultural improvement, etc. Removal of marginal vegetation from water bodies. Pollution such as agricultural run-off.

MANAGEMENT Maintain a high stable water level and a succession or mosaic of vegetation types using rotational pond or ditch management if necessary to ensure a continuous range of marginal conditions.
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