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Xylota jakutorum

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Xylota jakutorum Reply with quote

Xylota jakutorum Bagachanova, 1980

NomenclatureIdentification ease/difficulty: 2

StatusSources of information
Pictures:
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Last edited by stuart on Sun Jan 22, 2006 10:40 am; edited 2 times in total
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:41 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Xylota coeruleiventris Zetterstedt, 1838

Biology: The larvae are found in sap-filled tunnels of the bark weevil Hylobius abietis (Rotheray & Stuke, 1998). It is associated with conifer plantations, and unlike most members of the genus, can frequently be found visiting flowers, especially Ranunculus, in open spaces such as rides, fire-breaks and wayleaves. It is particularly abundant in areas felled 2-3 years previously, after which time the stumps become suitable for the weevil larvae

Distribution: Although there are museum specimens from Caledonian pine forest in the Highlands of Scotland going back to the end of the last century, recent records extend throughout northern and western Britain. It seems to have spread southwards into conifer plantations, and to be continuing to do so, with recent records from Dartmoor, the Mendips, Kent and the Norfolk Brecklands. If this trend continues, it will be found in most parts of Britain before too long, except perhaps for the East Midlands and the Fens
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

XYLOTA COERULEIVENTRIS Zetterstedt NOTABLE

DISTRIBUTION A northern and western species with records scattered widely in Scotland, northern England as far south as the West Midlands, much of Wales and isolated records in south west England (Devon, Somerset and Dorset).

HABITAT Coniferous woodland, including both ancient Caledonian pine forest in Scotland and modern plantations elsewhere, with a requirement for dead wood and old or diseased trees.

ECOLOGY Larvae develop in dead wood, probably only of conifers, and the choice of sites suggests that it can exploit dead wood situations such as log piles or windblown trees. Adults, recorded from June to August and may be found on sunlit foliage and are known to visit the flowers of buttercups, globeflower, bramble and various umbellifers.

STATUS Possibly declining in Scotland where it seems to have been particularly widespread and common at the turn of the century yet with few recent records. However its range in the south appears to be expanding rapidly probably through modern forestry practices and it is now not infrequent in many parts of Wales. About 35 known post 1960 sites, mostly representing plantations away from native pine woods.

THREAT The apparent ability to utilize areas of modern forestry means that its future is probably assured.

MANAGEMENT Maintain good levels of dead wood at sites (logs, stumps and branches); also open rides and clearings with flowers for adult feeding.
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