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Caliprobola speciosa

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Caliprobola speciosa Reply with quote

Caliprobola speciosa (Rossi, 1790)

Identification ease/difficulty: 2

StatusHabitat indicator statusSources of information
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Last edited by stuart on Wed Jun 01, 2005 9:59 pm; edited 1 time in total
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:40 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Caliprobola speciosa (Rossi, 1790)

Biology: The larvae inhabit the decaying heartwood of *, particularly large old stumps, where they may occur deep in the roots. Adults are usually found resting on, or flying around suitable stumps, and may be attracted to heart rot when this is exposed or disturbed. They can also be found visiting flowers, especially Crataegus, at some distance from breeding sites. Speight (1998) reports that they can be found away from forests, feeding on flowers along large rivers with gallery forest. He suggests that they are using these riverine “corridors” to move between forests

Distribution: Recent records of this rare species are almost confined to the New Forest and the Windsor area, and it is not uncommon at the latter site. There is an undated record (quoted in Coe (1953)) from the remnants of Needwood Forest near Burton on Trent, and a sighting at Fairmile Common, Surrey in 1995
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Caliprobola speciosa[i] (Rossi, 1790) ENDANGERED

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 110 and 219, pl. 10:9.

Distribution: Currently only in Windsor Forest and the New Forest. There are very old records in Yorkshire and Derbyshire.

Habitat and ecology: A puparium was found in wet wood pulp in the base of a hollow beech stump[i]*
. The adults seem to favour tall stumps in small sunny glades, mainly of beech but rarely also of oakQuercus.

Status: A great rarity. It is now almost certainly confined to the New Forest, where it is only frequent at one site, and to Windsor Forest, where it has become much rarer over the last twenty years. This is one of our most handsome hoverflies, so the restriction and decline at its best sites in the last forty years as a consequence of reduction in habitat is of concern.

Author: A.E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

CALIPROBOLA SPECIOSA (Rossi) ENDANGERED

DISTRIBUTION Recent records are known only from the Windsor Forest area of Berkshire and the New Forest, Hampshire, though old records exist for Derbyshire and Yorkshire. A recent sight record is also reported from a site in Nottinghamshire.

HABITAT Ancient broadleaved woodland and parkland. Associated mainly with hollow stumps of beech and more rarely oaks and elm.

ECOLOGY The larvae have been reared from wet wood pulp in the base of a hollow beech stump and a female has been observed ovipositing in the wood mould of a hollow stump during which she completely buried herself, reappearing after about half a minute. Other more casual observations suggest that rot holes in between buttress roots of large stumps or post mature trees, which lead to a rotten interior are also oviposition sites. Adults may be found sunbathing on or near such stumps, or flying in their vicinity, in both dense and open woodlands and occasionally at the blossom of hawthorn or at sap runs. Males are said to be accomplished hoverers, though this is rarely observed. They are recorded in May and June.

STATUS Highly restricted though regularly recorded and even occasionally locally frequent in parts of the New Forest (Denny Wood, Mark Ash, Bramshaw Wood) and parts of Windsor, though populations seem to fluctuate markedly from year to year.

THREAT Clearance of ancient forests and parkland for conversion to agriculture or intensive forestry and removal of the dead stumps.

MANAGEMENT Retain any dead stumps within a site, maximising the number of diseased and post mature trees to ensure a continuous supply of this resource. Maintain the presence of rides and clearings to provide flowering shrubs, especially hawthorn, for adult feeding.
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