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Brachypalpus laphriformis

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Brachypalpus laphriformis Reply with quote

Brachypalpus laphriformis (FallÚn, 1816)

NomenclatureIdentification ease/difficulty: 2

StatusHabitat indicator statusSources of information
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Last edited by stuart on Wed Jun 01, 2005 9:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 737
Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:40 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Brachypalpus laphriformis (FallÚn, 1816) Brachypalpus bimaculatus (Macquart, 1829) in Coe (1953) and Kloet & Hincks (1976)

Biology: The larvae are found in rot holes in large deciduous trees, usually *, but also Fraxinus and Quercus. Males are usually found sunning themselves on trunks or flying around fallen trees in clearings. Females are more elusive, but can be found investigating trees suitable for breeding. In flight they closely resembles solitary bees of the genus Osmia and may therefore have been overlooked. Occasionally found at tree flowers such as Prunus

Distribution: A scarce species of well-wooded areas in southern Britain. Whilst probably most frequent in classic dead-wood localities, especially the New Forest, there have also been recent records from south-west England and South Wales. Its distribution extends north to the Lake District
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

BRACHYPALPUS LAPHRIFORMIS (Fallen) NOTABLE

DISTRIBUTION Recorded widely in southern Westmorland (1988), England, especially in Hampshire, though occurring sporadically as far north as Yorkshire (1984), into South Wales (Glamorganshire 1952 1982) and even a reputed record from Argyllshire (1982).

HABITAT Ancient broadleaved woodland and parkland. Closely associated with dead hollow trunks of beech and much more rarely with ash and oak.

ECOLOGY The larvae develop in the rotten wood of hollow trunks, prefering those broken off two to four metres above the ground. Stumps in both shaded woodland and open parkland seem to be used. Adults may be seen sunbathing or hovering around such stumps or living trees nearby and are recorded from late April to early August. They occasionally visit flowers such as hawthorn but seem less reliant upon a source of nectar than many other hoverflies.

STATUS Very local with about 40 known post 1960 sites. Many of its old sites are now destroyed and no colonization of new sites seems to occur. However, it is still widespread and locally frequent over much of Hampshire and Windsor Forest, Berkshire with other post 1960 records for Devon, Wiltshire, Sussex, Dorset, Oxfordshire, Glamorganshire and Yorkshire. Status revised from RDB3 (Shirt 1987).

THREAT Clearance of ancient beech woods for agriculture or intensive forestry and removal of hollow trunks or stumps.

MANAGEMENT Retain and ensure continuity of tall dead stumps, especially self pollarding trunks, in the future, maximising the number of diseased and post mature trees within a site.
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