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Parhelophilus consimilis

 
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Parhelophilus consimilis Reply with quote

Parhelophilus consimilis (Malm, 1863)

Identification ease/difficulty: 3

StatusSources of information
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:41 am    Post subject: Species account from the Provisional atlas Reply with quote

Species account from Provisional atlas of British hoverflies, Ball & Morris, 2000.

Parhelophilus consimilis (Malm, 1863) Helophilus consimilis Malm in Coe (1953)

Biology: Larvae undescribed. Associated with accumulations of wet, decaying matter, particularly Typha, in eutrophic bogs, but also occasionally in fens in eastern England. Adults are generally found in lush vegetation fringing water bodies and rarely stray far from water. They fly rapidly around, and settle on, emergent vegetation and visit flowers such as Menyanthes, Ranunculus and Potentilla palustris.

Distribution: Although the scarcest of the three Parhelophilus species, it has proved to be much less rare than previously thought, being found at widely scattered localities from Dorset to southern Scotland, sometimes in abundance
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stuart
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from Insect Red Data Book, Shirt, 1987 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Insect Red Data Book, Shirt (1989).

Parhelophilus consimilis (Malm, 1863) VULNERABLE

Identification: Stubbs & Falk (1983), pp. 100 and 199.

Distribution: Scattered records in England, South Wales and south-west Scotland.

Habitat and ecology: The transition between bog and fen, with pools and great reedmaceTypha latifolia, is apparently preferred. However, the habitat does not always agree with this description. The larvae are aquatic.

Status: There are few records, either old or recent, often concerning small and vulnerable sites.Conservation: Only one record applies to a nature reserve, run by the Herefordshire and Radnorshire Nature Trust.

Author: A. E. Stubbs.
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stuart
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Location: Peterborough, UK

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 9:08 am    Post subject: Data sheet from National Review of Diptera, Falk, 1991 Reply with quote

Datasheet from the Review of Scarce and Threatened Diptera, Falk (1991).

PARHELOPHILUS CONSIMILIS (Malm) VULNERABLE

DISTRIBUTION Records are few though widely dispersed in southern England (notably the south west), the Norfolk Broads, the Lincolnshire coast, South Wales and the Galloway coastal belt of south west Scotland. Whilst most records are coastal, inland records are present such as those from the Watford area of Hertfordshire, and Radnorshire in Wales.

HABITAT It seems to favour pools which are transitional between bog and fen, often in association with Typha.

ECOLOGY Larvae aquatic and of the rat-tailed maggot type, possibly living between the leaf sheaths of Typha. Adults recorded from May to August.

STATUS Post 1960 records from nine sites: Crymlyn Bog, Glamorganshire (1980), with a very long history stretching back to 1906), a site on the Gwent levels (1980); Aberithan Bog, Radnorshire (1982); Llyn Hafodol, Anglesey (1987); Cassiobury Park (several records in 1986) and possibly nearby at Brickets Wood (determination correct, date needs checking), both in Hertfordshire; Little Matlock Wood, Derbyshire (1987); Gordon Moss, Berwickshire (1988); Carrick Pools and Newnham Moss, Kirkcudbrightshire (1979). There is the possibility of further sites existing and the close resemblance to commoner species of the genus may have led to some under recording.

THREAT The drainage of suitable marshland for agricultural improvement, afforestation and industrial coastal developments (at Crymlyn). Also pollution from agricultural run-off and industry (Crymlyn). Over enthusiastic clearance of Typha.

MANAGEMENT Maintain a stable regime with Typha, any necessary management being on rotation to ensure continuity of a good population of Typha..
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